typewriter

ONE NEVER KNOWS WHAT WILL TRANSPIRE

Yesterday, during the writers’ meeting in La Junta, I sat unobserved in the corner, listening and taking copulas notes. Being shy and quiet is my nature.

I learned that I should use punctuation in my writing. I learned that a bullet isn’t used in place of an indent for a paragraph. I learned I have a spell checker. I learned margins are not one-inch. I learned I have a lot to learn if I want to become a writer.

The meeting ended on a grand note.

Pat Zabriskie jumped up from her chair and said, “I have to get going.” She then charged out the door. I picked up my note book, which was five pounds heavier than when I arrived at the meeting–heavy with the notes I had taken–and exited the building.

You can imagine my surprise! There on the sidewalk lay Pat on her back, her feet in the gutter, and her shoulders on the side walk. In my haste to help her, I almost tripped over a bicycle and 507 Florida grapefruits. Pat had her mind on something else when she exited the building. She didn’t see the teenager on a bicycle pulling a Red Flyer wagon loaded with grapefruit.

“Pat! Are you okay?” I asked.

“Yes, I am. Now help me up before someone calls the cops.”

“Okay.” I said. “What happened?”

Pat got this cute smile on her face and said, “I didn’t see this young man and his bicycle and the Red Flyer wagon loaded with grapefruit. I jumped over the bicycle and my shoe lace caught on the handlebars of the bicycle.”

To make a long story very short, Pat wasn’t hurt. I understand her husband told her, “From now on always tie your shoes when you go to town.”
This account is the truth as I remember it.]

Oris, the truthful observer.